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Swarthmore College    
College Bulletin - Course Catalog 
  
 
  Sep 19, 2017
 
College Bulletin - Course Catalog

Educational Studies


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Courses  

Faculty

K. ANN RENNINGER, Professor and Chair
LISA SMULYAN, Professor
DIANE DOWNER ANDERSON, Associate Professor3
ELAINE ALLARD, Assistant Professor
EDWIN MAYORGA, Assistant Professor3
JOSEPH NELSON, Assistant Professor
ROSEANN LIU, Visiting Assistant Professor
JENNIFER BRADLEY, Visiting Assistant Professor
MARGARET INMAN LINN, Visiting Associate Professor (part time)
RUTHANNE KRAUSS, Administrative Assistant
CATHERINE DUNN, School Liaison


Absent on leave, 2017-2018.


The Educational Studies Department at Swarthmore engages students in the investigation of educational theory, policy, research and practice from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. We prepare students to work in educational research or policy, to enter the teaching profession, and/or to pursue graduate study in educational studies or a related field. The department encourages undergraduates to think critically and creatively about the processes of teaching and learning and about the place of education in society. The department is also committed to preparing students to address education-related needs in an era of rapidly increasing racial, ethnic and linguistic diversity and technological change and to develop students' abilities to participate fully in civic, cultural and economic arenas. Both introductory and upper level courses in the department draw on theory and research in anthropology, economics, history, political science, psychology and sociology.

The Academic Program


Students interested in educational studies at Swarthmore may design an honors or course special major in educational studies and another discipline or an honors or course minor in educational studies. Students also have the option to pursue teacher certification.

Course Special Major


In special majors involving educational studies the student combines work in educational studies with work in another academic department or interdisciplinary program. Pre-established programs have been created with the following disciplines: biology, chemistry, computer science, English literature, French, German, history, Latin American and Latino studies, linguistics, mathematics/statistics, music, peace and conflict studies, physics, political science, psychology, Russian, sociology/anthropology, and Spanish. Special majors with other disciplines can be pursued with the approval of both the Educational Studies Department and the second department or program. In the case of all special majors involving educational studies, both departments collaborate in advising the student.

The special major usually requires 10 to 12 credits, at least 5 of which must be in educational studies. All special majors are required to complete a thesis or a comprehensive examination integrating work in their two fields of study. Special majors are encouraged to take EDUC 065 Educational Research for Social Change in the spring of their sophomore or junior year. This course, which can be taken for 0.5 or 1 credit, prepares students to write a special major thesis in their senior year. Each partnering department or program provides specific course requirements for the completion of a special major and for the thesis/comprehensive exam, details of which may be found on the departmental website.

If special majors pursue teaching certification, EDUC 092: Curriculum and Methods Seminar and EDUC 093: Practice Teaching are not counted as part of a special major requirements. The prerequisite for acceptance to the special major program is successful completion of EDUC 014: Pedagogy and Power: Introduction to Education and one other course in the department.

Course Minor


The educational studies minor provides students with the opportunity to choose from a variety of educational studies courses and prompts students to reflect on the overarching theme of their experience in the department. The educational studies minor requires at least 5 credits in educational studies. Students identify a focus when they apply for the minor and then explain how their coursework supports this focus. Possible foci include but are not limited to Teaching and Practice, Educational Policy, Educational Psychology, School and Society, Special Education, Urban Education, Environmental Education, and Literacy. The prerequisite for acceptance to the educational studies minor program is EDUC 014 . Minors may also pursue teacher certification.

Honors Program


The department supports the Honors Program for special majors and minors.

Honors Special Majors


Students may opt to pursue an Honors Special major in educational studies and another department or interdisciplinary program. Preestablished special majors have been created with the following disciplines: English, linguistics, political science, psychology and sociology/anthropology. Honors special majors with other disciplines can be pursued with the approval of both educational studies and the partnering department or program. The Honors special major, like the Course special major, requires a total of 10 to 12 credits, at least 5 of which must be in educational studies. However, Honors special majors must also include 4 Honors preparations in their program. These must be distributed as follows:

  • 3 (2 credit) Honors preparations, at least 1 or 2 of which must be in educational studies and 1 or 2 in the other discipline.
    • Most honors preparations in educational studies consist of a 2 credit honors seminar.
    • It is possible to complete a one-credit educational studies course with a one-credit attachment as an honors preparation. Availability of this option is limited and designed with a supervising faculty member from the Educational Studies Department.
  • 1 Honors preparation through the completion of a double-credit thesis. This thesis normally serves to integrate the fields of the special major and is supervised by faculty members in both departments of the special major. Honors special majors are encouraged to take EDUC 065 Qualitative Research Methods: Educational Research for Social Change in the spring of their sophomore or junior year. This course, which can be taken for 0.5 or 1 credit, prepares students to write the special major thesis in their senior year.
  • Honors preparation through the completion of a double-credit thesis. This thesis serves to integrate the fields of the special major and is supervised by faculty members in both departments of the special major.

Each partnering department or program also provides specific requirements for the completion of a Honors special major, which may be found on the departmental website. Students are expected to have a B+ average in their educational studies courses to complete an Honors special major. Additionally, students must complete external examinations upon completion of the program. The prerequisite for acceptance to the Honors Educational Studies Major Program is EDUC 014, 2 additional educational studies courses of the student's choice, and an average grade of B+ in all educational studies courses at the time of application. Honors majors may also pursue teacher certification.

Honors Minors


Students may opt to pursue an Honors minor in educational studies. The Honors minor requires five credits in educational studies, including EDUC 014 (1 credit), one Honors seminar (2 credits), and two additional credits of the student's choice. Students are expected to have a B+ average in their educational studies courses and to complete the external Honors examination. The prerequisite for acceptance to the Honors educational studies minor program is EDUC 014. Honors minors may also pursue teacher certification.

Additional Honors Program Details


External Examinations


As part of the Honors Program, students complete an examination for each completed preparation. The thesis preparation for Honors special major students involves a 45-60-minute individual oral exam on their work with an outside examiner. Examination for Honors preparations other than the thesis includes a written and an oral component. The written portion of the exam is set by an external examiner who writes exam questions based on the seminar syllabus. The exam may include a problem set, a case and/or additional readings relevant to the work students have undertaken in that preparation. These materials may be sent to the student in advance of the written exam. All educational studies honors exams are written in the Educational Materials Center. A maximum of 5 hours is allowed for completion of each exam.

Intellectual Autobiography


All Honors students (special majors and minors) in educational studies write a short intellectual autobiography that is sent to the Honors examiner. Students may also choose to send to the examiner a paper from an Honors seminar. The autobiography and the paper are not formally evaluated by the examiner; they are intended to familiarize the examiner with the student's experience and background in educational studies, since each student in each seminar brings different disciplinary content to his/her understanding of the material. The autobiography is written in the spring of the senior year under the supervision of the department chair in educational studies.

Sophomore Plan Application Process


Students interested in pursuing a special major or minor through the department are encouraged to discuss their interests and plans with faculty members. The department's website may also be helpful. Faculty will advise and assist students as they explore the multiple options available to them.

In order to complete the Sophomore Plan, students will:

Pathways to Teaching


Swarthmore students come to an interest in teaching at many points during their own educational careers-some before they enter college, others during their four undergraduate years, and some as they investigate possible careers after Swarthmore. Students are encouraged to explore the many opportunities available to them in the field of education. Pathways to Teaching, on the department's website, offers students more information on the options available to them:

  • Mentoring and tutoring opportunities offered through Swarthmore.
  • Summer opportunities to work in classrooms or enrichment programs or complete an educationrelated internship.
  • Teacher certification at Swarthmore.
  • Graduate study in education, including teaching programs and other programs in educational studies.
  • Post-graduation teaching/education job opportunities and resources (for all students-with or without certification)

Research Opportunities and Experiences


Engaging in research is integral to students' work in educational studies. Participation in research supports students to understand the importance of research to theory, policy-making, and practice.

In each course and seminar in the department, students are introduced to qualitative and/or quantitative methods of research, which they use to work directly with questions addressed in coursework. Students not only read original research, but they also collect and analyze data using appropriate methods in each course.

Students are strongly encouraged to take EDUC 065: Qualitative Research Methods: Educational Research for Social Change in the spring of their sophomore or junior year. This course, which can be taken for 0.5 or 1 credit, prepares students to write a special major thesis in their senior year. It can be used as the methods course for special majors with Sociology and Anthropology.

As a culminating activity in the department, most special majors write a thesis. Students select the focus of their thesis work; theses typically build on students' course work and methods training in educational studies and the other department comprising their special major.

Some students conduct independent research or serve as research assistants on faculty members' projects. Students may begin working as research assistants as early as the summer following their first year. Many such collaborations have led to student-faculty co-authored conference presentations, articles, and chapters.

Fieldwork and Service-Learning Opportunities


Bridging research and practice is a goal for courses and seminars in the department. Many courses and seminars have a distinctive field work component. Course descriptions indicate if a course involves a field placement.

Depending on transportation options, students can request fieldwork placements in urban, suburban, or rural communities and choose from public, charter, or private school settings. Students are encouraged to use the field placements as an opportunity to explore a range of school and population types. A list of school sites may be found on the department's website. In addition, EDUC 070: Community Outreach Practicum is a course designed for students working in out-of-school educational and community-based settings.

Study Abroad


Students requesting credit in educational studies for course or field work done abroad (or at another institution in the U.S.) must take EDUC 014 . This course may be taken before or after the study abroad credit is completed, but the credit will only be accepted after Introduction to Education has been completed.

Three study abroad programs with explicit developed educational studies components include:

The Cloud Forest School Program, Costa Rica


Through this program, students complete a schoolbased internship (3 educational studies credits) and receive an intercultural credit for Spanish language learning. For more information see http://www.swarthmore.edu/academics/educational-studies/academic-program/off-campus-study/cloud-forest-program.xml .

Globalization, Environment and Society: South Africa


This program focuses on both environmental and educational issues such as literacy, equity, intersections between schools, communities, and the environment in South Africa. For more information see  http://www.swarthmore.edu/academics/educational-studies/academic-program/off-campus-study/globalization-and-the-environment-program.xml .

Transfer Credit


Transfer credit is accepted once a student has completed EDUC 014. To request transfer credit, the student must present a syllabus and all course work for the department to review. Some additional work may be required.

Teacher Certification


Swarthmore offers a state accredited teacher preparation program for both special majors and minors (Honors or Course). Certification for elementary, middle and/or high school teaching is transferable to all 50 states; after PA certification, some states may require additional exams or content. A guide to certification reciprocity is available through Certification Map at http://certificationmap.com/states/reciprocity-disclaimer/.

Swarthmore's programs for secondary certification are designed with guidance from faculty members in the discipline in which the student is being certified as well as members of the Educational Studies Department. Students preparing for elementary certification design their course of study with advisement from the Swarthmore Educational Studies Department and Eastern University.

Formal admission to the teacher certification program occurs at the start of EDUC 092: Curriculum and Methods and EDUC 093: Practice Teaching after students have successfully completed their core educational studies and discipline major requirements. Students must have completed 12 Swarthmore College credits (48 credit hours) to enroll in the program.

State Requirements for Certification


In order to be certified, students must attain either an overall grade point average of 3.0 or an overall grade point average of 2.8 GPA and a qualifying score on the appropriate PRAXIS exams. More information about the exams required for certification can be found on the Educational Studies Department website under "Teacher Certification > Student Teaching > Exam Information."

Students seeking certification must meet 1) all Swarthmore's general requirements for graduation with a Bachelor's degree, 2) educational studies requirements for certification, and 3) state teaching certification distribution requirements in mathematics, English literature, and English composition. The following outline presents the ways in which students might meet these state distribution requirements:

Mathematics: 6 credit hours. This may be fulfilled by any sufficient combination of the following options:

Activity Credit Hour Value
Swarthmore 1-credit Math/Statistics or Natural Science course 4
Score of 4 or 5 on AP Calculus AB 4
Score of 4 or 5 on AP Calculus AB/BC 4
Score of 4 or 5 on AP Statistics 4
Score of 6 or 7 on the Higher Level IB Exam 4
Scores of 560 or higher on the SAT level 1 or II math level IC or IIC 3
CLEP math test (http://clep.collegeboard.org/exam) 4
Combination should total 6

English Literature: 3 credit hours. This may be fulfilled by any of the following options:

Activity Credit Hour Value
Swarthmore 1-credit English Department course 4
Score of 4 or 5 on AP English Literature 4
Score of 6 or 7 on the Higher Level IB Exam 4
CLEP literature test (http://clep.collegeboard.org/exam) 4
Combination should total 3

English Composition: 3 credit hours, met by the College's general distribution requirement of Writing courses.

Certification Options


Swarthmore offers a wide variety of teacher certification options for students who are interested in receiving this credential.

Elementary Certification (Grades Pre-K-4)


Certification in elementary education is granted to Swarthmore students through Eastern University. Students complete the majority of their coursework at Swarthmore, including student teaching, but must also complete 2 Eastern University summer courses (offered at Swarthmore) in order to receive elementary certification. Eastern University will award the Pennsylvania PreK-4 certification; students who want to complete the 4-8 elementary/middle school certification may add this certification through testing. The department recommends that students complete both PreK-4 and 4-8 certifications.

Students must fulfill all of the state general distribution requirements. Additionally, required Swarthmore coursework includes:

  • EDUC 014: Pedagogy and Power: Introduction to Education
  • EDUC/PSYC 021: Educational Psychology
  • EDUC 042: Teaching Diverse Young Learners
  • EDUC/PSYC 026: Special Education
  • EDUC 053: Educating Emergent Bilinguals
  • Recommended-EDUC 023: Adolescence

The Eastern University summer school program consists of two elementary methods courses in Language Arts and Reading. The hybrid online and face-to-face course work begins in mid-May and ends in early June for a total cost of approximately $3,890 (cost as of spring 2015; students on financial aid can apply for support). Students can receive 1 Swarthmore College credit for these courses.

Students must consult with the chair of Swarthmore's Educational Studies Department regarding their program of study to ensure that it includes a representative distribution of English, social studies, math, and science coursework required for 4-8 certification.

Elementary Certification candidates complete one semester of student teaching through Swarthmore, which consists of EDUC 092: Curriculum and Methods (2 credits) and EDUC 093: Practice Teaching (2 credits).

Secondary Certification (Grades 7-12)


The department offers secondary (7-12) teacher certification in biology, chemistry, citizenship, English, mathematics, physics, and social studies. The department also offers  K-12 certification in French, German, Russian, or Spanish. Students must complete a major or special major in their area of certification. Majors/special majors in history, economics, or political science receive secondary certification in either citizenship or social studies, and majors/special majors in psychology or sociology/anthropology receive secondary certification in social studies.

In order to be certified, students should fulfill all of the state general distribution requirements. Additionally, students must complete a major or a special major in their area of certification and take a total of five and a half core courses in educational studies:

  • EDUC 014: Pedagogy and Power: Introduction to Education
  • EDUC/PSYC 021. Educational Psychology
  • EDUC/PSYC 023. Adolescence
  • EDUC 023A. Adolescents and Special Education (0.5 credit)
  • EDUC/PSYC 026. Special Education
  • EDUC 053: Educating Emergent Bilinguals

Students must complete subject-specific requirements that may or may not differ from the special major or major requirements already established. Students should refer to the subject-specific requirements charts on the Educational Studies Department website for the special major discipline's course obligations with teacher certification (http://www.swarthmore.edu/educational-studies/secondary-certification)

Students must complete one semester of student teaching, which consists of EDUC 092: Curriculum and Methods (2 credits) and EDUC 093: Practice Teaching (2 credits).

World Language Teaching Certification (Grades K through 12)


Students who wish to teach a world language (Spanish, French, German or Russian) will receive K-12 teaching certification in their specific language area upon completion of the program. This will allow them to teach elementary, middle, and high school. All world language certification students should follow the pathway for secondary teacher certification to attain the K-12 certification. Refer to the Secondary Certification  section for details.

Student Teaching


EDUC 092: Curriculum and Methods (2 credits) and EDUC 093: Practice Teaching (2 credits) are completed during the first semester of the senior year or in a ninth semester after graduation. Placement for practice teaching is available in a range of public and private schools.

Ninth Semester


Students who have completed all of the requirements for certification (in their discipline and in educational studies) except for student teaching may return following graduation to complete the teacher certification program during a ninth semester. During this semester, students can only take EDUC 092: Curriculum and Methods (2 credits) and EDUC 093: Practice Teaching (2 credits). This option is only offered in the fall, and the cost is $6,300.00. Starting in fall 2015, some tuition reimbursement will be available for ninth semester students. Students in the ninth semester program have full access to computing and other campus facilities but are not eligible for campus housing.

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